January 22

offal

offal. o, f, f, a, l. offal. Wilson was a connoisseur of food, both foreign and domestic. His was a proclivity towards meat, and he spent the lunch hour diving deeper and deeper into the bowels of the city to seek it out. The further he went, the more his fetish grew. More bizarre, more obscure. The long lunches did not go unnoticed by his colleagues. Not long after his boss, whom he considered a friend, confronted him. He demanded to know where Wilson went. "Is it drugs?" he said. "Are you hooked on the crack rock?" Wilson laughed. "No, no," Wilson said. "Don't be silly. I'll take you if really want to know. But no judgment." So Michael and Wilson trekked to a dark alley of the Hmong ghetto. They climbed to the top floor of a dirty building. Wilson knocked three times. The door opened, chain snapping. "Who dat?" the guy demanded in a burley voice. Wilson leaned in and whispered: "Ku n-guy." The door shut, the chain rattled, and then opened again. A pervasive smell of offal gripped Michael by the throat. "What is this place," Michael gagged. But Wilson didn't answer. He was high on the sweet, sweet smell of the Sautéed flesh of silverback gorilla. He turned to Michael. "Let's eat!"

/ˈɔ fəl/

noun. 1 the rejected or waste parts of a butchered animal. 2 a a dead body. b carrion. 3 a that which is thrown away as worthless or unfit for use. b refuse. c rubbish.

Wilson was a connoisseur of food, both foreign and domestic. His was a proclivity towards meat, and he spent the lunch hour diving deeper and deeper into the bowels of the city to seek it out. The further he went, the more his fetish grew. More bizarre, more obscure. The long lunches did not go unnoticed by his colleagues. Not long after his boss, whom he considered a friend, confronted him. He demanded to know where Wilson went. “Is it drugs?” he said. “Are you hooked on the crack rock?” Wilson laughed. “No, no,” Wilson said. “Don’t be silly. I’ll take you if really want to know. But no judgment.” So Michael and Wilson trekked to a dark alley of the Hmong ghetto. They climbed to the top floor of a dirty building. Wilson knocked three times. The door opened, chain snapping. “Who dat?” the guy demanded in a burley voice. Wilson leaned in and whispered: “Ku n-guy.” The door shut, the chain rattled, and then opened again. A pervasive smell of offal gripped Michael by the throat. “What is this place,” Michael gagged. But Wilson didn’t answer. He was high on the sweet, sweet smell of the Sautéed flesh of silverback gorilla. He turned to Michael. “Let’s eat!”

solicitous. s, o, l, i, c, i, t, o, u, s. solicitous. Mr Morgan was a polite and solicitous history teacher at Centreville High. He made Kendra feel -- even as she tried to resist his sexual overtures -- that he truly had the young sophomore's interests at heart. And he did. And then Kendra fell pregnant. Fearing for his job, and jail, Morgan pushed hard for an abortion. Believing, in the naïve way young people do, that Morgan was her one true love, and the circumstance was destiny, she refused. "How can we tamper with fate?" she asked. "This was meant to be." Morgan agreed. But not before he cut the brake lines on her car.

/səˈlɪs ɪ təs/

adjective. 1 a eager to obtain something desirable, or to avoid anything evil. b concerned. c anxious. d careful.

Mr Morgan was a polite and solicitous history teacher at Centreville High. He made Kendra feel — even as she tried to resist his sexual overtures — that he truly had the young sophomore’s interests at heart. And he did. And then Kendra fell pregnant. Fearing for his job, and jail, Morgan pushed hard for an abortion. Believing, in the naïve way young people do, that Morgan was her one true love, and the circumstance was destiny, she refused. “How can we tamper with fate?” she asked. “This was meant to be.” Morgan agreed. But not before he cut the brake lines on her car.

January 19

malefic

malefic. m, a, l, e, f, i, c. malefic. Eve knew it was wrong to leave the bar with Matt that night. She did it anyway. Later, she'd say she was hypnotized by his malefic eyes. That he filled an emotional void in her life. Her friends encouraged this. But not long ago she'd felt the same way about her husband. And the guy before that. And the guy before that. Lies -- they were just lies she used to rationalize running from one to the next. This was just the way Eve swam through life. Leaving the scattered remnants of the best these men had to offer in her wake.

/məˈlɛf ɪk/

adjective. 1 doing mischief. 2 causing harm or evil. 3 nefarious. 4 hurtful.

Eve knew it was wrong to leave the bar with Matt that night. She did it anyway. Later, she’d say she was hypnotized by his malefic eyes. That he filled an emotional void in her life. Her friends encouraged this. But not long ago she’d felt the same way about her husband. And the guy before that. And the guy before that. Lies — they were just lies she used to rationalize running from one to the next. This was just the way Eve swam through life. Leaving the scattered remnants of the best these men had to offer in her wake.

surreptitious. s, u, r, r, e, p, t, i, t, i, o, u, s. surreptitious. Senator Russo slowed his car and pulled to the side of the road. He'd been stopped by the cops many times before, and they generally let him go with a warning. But this time was different. This time he hadn't been speeding. This time, riding shotgun, was Janice, a highly-paid professional. She was a hooker, and she knew the route. Reaching into Russo's jacket pocket, she pulled out the remnants of the eight ball of cocaine they'd been sharing, and surreptitiously shoved it in her pussy. It was at that moment that Russo knew, if they were able to shake the cops, that he was in for a monumental night.

/ˌsɜr əpˈtɪʃ əs/

adjective. 1 a made or introduced fraudulently. b clandestine. c stealthy. 2 done or made by stealth, or without proper authority.

Senator Russo slowed his car and pulled to the side of the road. He’d been stopped by the cops many times before, and they generally let him go with a warning. But this time was different. This time he hadn’t been speeding. This time, riding shotgun, was Janice, a highly-paid professional. She was a hooker, and she knew the route. Reaching into Russo’s jacket pocket, she pulled out the remnants of the eight ball of cocaine they’d been sharing, and surreptitiously shoved it in her pussy. It was at that moment that Russo knew, if they were able to shake the cops, that he was in for a monumental night.